Hi, I have a bachelor's in speech-language pathology and have been considering a career change to RD for quite some time now. However, I'd like to know what I'm getting myself into. I've never taken college chemistry classes. I always hear stories about people struggling in them. I took chemistry in high school and failed. I'm not that great at math (I had terrible teachers and lacked confidence) and know that RDs use math daily in their jobs. Basically, the science and math are holding me back. Despite this, I still like learning about science. I love learning about nutrition and wellness and helping people. And I love that as an RD, you get to do these things. I just don't know if I'll be capable of the science and math. Would you recommend RD for someone like me?

Hi, I have a bachelor's in speech-language pathology and have been considering a career change to RD for quite some time now. However, I'd like to know what I'm getting myself into. I've never taken college chemistry classes. I always hear stories about people struggling in them. I took chemistry in high school and failed. I'm not that great at math (I had terrible teachers and lacked confidence) and know that RDs use math daily in their jobs. Basically, the science and math are holding me back. Despite this, I still like learning about science. I love learning about nutrition and wellness and helping people. And I love that as an RD, you get to do these things. I just don't know if I'll be capable of the science and math. Would you recommend RD for someone like me?

What is about being an RD that appeals to you? You can help people as a SLP. Science/Health is at the underpinning of nutrition (biology, biochem) and while understanding those interactions is fundamental (I believe) if you want to work in wellness or nutrition education you don't need to be getting A+ in biochem to be an RD. The math function is generally for clinical RDs and is usually fairly basic, add, subtract, percentages and conversions, ratios etc.

What is about being an RD that appeals to you? You can help people as a SLP. Science/Health is at the underpinning of nutrition (biology, biochem) and while understanding those interactions is fundamental (I believe) if you want to work in wellness or nutrition education you don't need to be getting A+ in biochem to be an RD. The math function is generally for clinical RDs and is usually fairly basic, add, subtract, percentages and conversions, ratios etc.

Hi,

RD appeals to me because it is a harder science and more analytical. Like I mentioned earlier, I love learning about nutrition and wellness and want to support people through healthier eating and prevention. I also like learning about diseases. I don't want to help people in the way that SLPs do. I just graduated recently and just stuck it out even though I had doubts about it. I guess I wasn't specific enough about the math. The math in chemistry, I feel, was very difficult for me. There's lots of chemistry classes I would I have to take if I'm serious about this career.

Hi, RD appeals to me because it is a harder science and more analytical. Like I mentioned earlier, I love learning about nutrition and wellness and want to support people through healthier eating and prevention. I also like learning about diseases. I don't want to help people in the way that SLPs do. I just graduated recently and just stuck it out even though I had doubts about it. I guess I wasn't specific enough about the math. The math in chemistry, I feel, was very difficult for me. There's lots of chemistry classes I would I have to take if I'm serious about this career.

I use math daily in my dietitian jobs, most of it pretty basic, but I do use algebra regularly. You have to understand the hard science to have the foundation to understand the how and why of nutrition. Anyone can instruct someone on how to follow a diet if it's written down on a piece of paper, but being able to sift through the science to really be able to tell someone why a fad diet isn't a good idea is something that requires a firm scientific foundation. What alarms me is that you failed high school chemistry. You will have to take and pass (probably with a decent grade) college level chemistry, microbiology, biochem, and nutritional biochemistry (aka metabolism) which is pretty much a weed out class. You don't need an A+, but you need to pass the class. With pretty good grades or you won't get an internship. You do need an internship to be an RD.

I use math daily in my dietitian jobs, most of it pretty basic, but I do use algebra regularly. You have to understand the hard science to have the foundation to understand the how and why of nutrition. Anyone can instruct someone on how to follow a diet if it's written down on a piece of paper, but being able to sift through the science to really be able to tell someone why a fad diet isn't a good idea is something that requires a firm scientific foundation. What alarms me is that you failed high school chemistry. You will have to take and pass (probably with a decent grade) college level chemistry, microbiology, biochem, and nutritional biochemistry (aka metabolism) which is pretty much a weed out class. You don't need an A+, but you need to pass the class. With pretty good grades or you won't get an internship. You do need an internship to be an RD.
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