Need some feedback RD's. I recently had an outpt appt with father & son where son is Vegetarian (will eat only pepperoni pizza in diet). I really didn't want to say "hide blended veggies in foods" while son was present. Father states he was given a bottle recently and now does not want to consume foods. Will get Ensure 2x/day (morning/evening).

My question is - is this a texture sensory issue? or food jag?

Will eat PB&J, chips and fruit everyday at school, also chicken nuggets from McD's. No ground hamburger, regular chicken, no pork chops, etc.

I encouraged dad to purchase nuggets from grocery store or better yet, make your own by cutting chicken in small pieces and bread them and bake.

We have another appointment 2/7/18 without child, so I can get more depth as to why the child is not able to consume other meats. Goals that were given at this appointment: turn TV off and sit a dinner table for meal & try 1 meat item

Side note parents are recently divorcing and father has full custody of child.

Any insight or suggestions are truly appreciated as this is not an area I am well versed in.

Need some feedback RD's. I recently had an outpt appt with father & son where son is Vegetarian (will eat only pepperoni pizza in diet). I really didn't want to say "hide blended veggies in foods" while son was present. Father states he was given a bottle recently and now does not want to consume foods. Will get Ensure 2x/day (morning/evening). My question is - is this a texture sensory issue? or food jag? Will eat PB&J, chips and fruit everyday at school, also chicken nuggets from McD's. No ground hamburger, regular chicken, no pork chops, etc. I encouraged dad to purchase nuggets from grocery store or better yet, make your own by cutting chicken in small pieces and bread them and bake. We have another appointment 2/7/18 without child, so I can get more depth as to why the child is not able to consume other meats. Goals that were given at this appointment: turn TV off and sit a dinner table for meal & try 1 meat item **Side note** parents are recently divorcing and father has full custody of child. Any insight or suggestions are truly appreciated as this is not an area I am well versed in.

Sounds a lot more like a food jag secondary to major life changes (the divorce perhaps?) than it does sound like the child is truly vegetarian. It could most definitely be a sensory issue though if the texture of meats is a turn-off - I wonder when that onset? Has he always been this way or have these behaviors exacerbated since the divorce?

Also wondering how old the child is? Why would he have been given a bottle? Traditional interventions related to food jags would be to provide the child with items he will eat, while always offering an item that we would like the child to try or be accepting of. So giving him 1/2 pb & j with some fruit, and maybe a chicken tender on the side. Trying varied textured items with each meal as the "extra" item and keep a food diary to try and unveil any pattern or particular other textures the child will or will not try. Family-style meals could be good. Letting the child take part in choosing recipes and helping prepare meals could be effective. Serving meals in a "fun" way (dipping sauces/fun shapes/etc).

Again... without knowing other details this is a hard one, but you could also refer to a therapist if you feel this could be a behavior 2/2 major life changes, also could refer to a speech language pathologist to address the texture sensitivity.

Sounds a lot more like a food jag secondary to major life changes (the divorce perhaps?) than it does sound like the child is truly vegetarian. It could most definitely be a sensory issue though if the texture of meats is a turn-off - I wonder when that onset? Has he always been this way or have these behaviors exacerbated since the divorce? Also wondering how old the child is? Why would he have been given a bottle? Traditional interventions related to food jags would be to provide the child with items he will eat, while always offering an item that we would like the child to try or be accepting of. So giving him 1/2 pb & j with some fruit, and maybe a chicken tender on the side. Trying varied textured items with each meal as the "extra" item and keep a food diary to try and unveil any pattern or particular other textures the child will or will not try. Family-style meals could be good. Letting the child take part in choosing recipes and helping prepare meals could be effective. Serving meals in a "fun" way (dipping sauces/fun shapes/etc). Again... without knowing other details this is a hard one, but you could also refer to a therapist if you feel this could be a behavior 2/2 major life changes, also could refer to a speech language pathologist to address the texture sensitivity.
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