I work in california at a well regarded hospital, and it drives me crazy to see all of the overweight people in healthcare! Our patients must think we are mad. Why is it that so many healthcare providers are out of shape and in horrible states of health? I may be biased because I specialize in nutrition, but it drives me crazy! The other day I met a dietician who was borderline obese. How does this occur?

I work in california at a well regarded hospital, and it drives me crazy to see all of the overweight people in healthcare! Our patients must think we are mad. Why is it that so many healthcare providers are out of shape and in horrible states of health? I may be biased because I specialize in nutrition, but it drives me crazy! The other day I met a dietician who was borderline obese. How does this occur?

I know... I work in LTC and not only many RNs and LPNs are obese, almost all of them are smokers too. I thought this is ridiculous!

I know... I work in LTC and not only many RNs and LPNs are obese, almost all of them are smokers too. I thought this is ridiculous!
Posted by nutritiongeek133:
I work in california at a well regarded hospital, and it drives me crazy to see all of the overweight people in healthcare! Our patients must think we are mad. Why is it that so many healthcare providers are out of shape and in horrible states of health? I may be biased because I specialize in nutrition, but it drives me crazy! The other day I met a dietician who was borderline obese. How does this occur?
To find that out, you would need to get the back story and history and find out why that dietitian carries extra pounds. Weight control is not always easy, even for people who know how to do it. Especially as you age or deal with post-pregnancy. Or certain meds. The struggle is real, and I think dealing with that struggle can actually make a dietitian a more empathetic practitioner. I used to wonder why people didn't just follow my advice and easily lose weight (and judged them terribly) until I took a med that truly made me gain weight despite my best efforts to the contrary. Just my two cents. I have a much different perspective now.
Posted by nutritiongeek133:<BR>I work in california at a well regarded hospital, and it drives me crazy to see all of the overweight people in healthcare! Our patients must think we are mad. Why is it that so many healthcare providers are out of shape and in horrible states of health? I may be biased because I specialize in nutrition, but it drives me crazy! The other day I met a dietician who was borderline obese. How does this occur? To find that out, you would need to get the back story and history and find out why that dietitian carries extra pounds. Weight control is not always easy, even for people who know how to do it. Especially as you age or deal with post-pregnancy. Or certain meds. The struggle is real, and I think dealing with that struggle can actually make a dietitian a more empathetic practitioner. I used to wonder why people didn't just follow my advice and easily lose weight (and judged them terribly) until I took a med that truly made me gain weight despite my best efforts to the contrary. Just my two cents. I have a much different perspective now.
Posted by nutritiongeek133:
I work in california at a well regarded hospital, and it drives me crazy to see all of the overweight people in healthcare! Our patients must think we are mad. Why is it that so many healthcare providers are out of shape and in horrible states of health? I may be biased because I specialize in nutrition, but it drives me crazy! The other day I met a dietician who was borderline obese. How does this occur?
I used to think the way you did before I actually got to know the nurses and healthcare team. Their job is stressful-taking on all of the problems the patients have, dealing with family's. Working 12 hour shifts, night shifts take a toll on the body. Our job is busy but not that hard-we work 8-5, most holidays weekends off. We don't hold the stress and responsibility of really taking care of the patients like other health professionals. Dietitian is spelled with a t-someone had 2 say it!
Posted by nutritiongeek133:<BR>I work in california at a well regarded hospital, and it drives me crazy to see all of the overweight people in healthcare! Our patients must think we are mad. Why is it that so many healthcare providers are out of shape and in horrible states of health? I may be biased because I specialize in nutrition, but it drives me crazy! The other day I met a dietician who was borderline obese. How does this occur? I used to think the way you did before I actually got to know the nurses and healthcare team. Their job is stressful-taking on all of the problems the patients have, dealing with family's. Working 12 hour shifts, night shifts take a toll on the body. Our job is busy but not that hard-we work 8-5, most holidays weekends off. We don't hold the stress and responsibility of really taking care of the patients like other health professionals. Dietitian is spelled with a t-someone had 2 say it!

You bring up an interesting question- I got to see it from the patient perspective. I worked at a Diabetes Clinic for about 5 years. We had 2 providers, both nurse practitioners. One was very overweight and one that was thin. From a patient point of view, they would complain about both of them. Some patients didn't like the overweight one because they felt she couldn't give them healthy advice given she was overweight. They didn't like the thin one because they felt that she had no clue what they dealt with because she was thin and in shape.

You bring up an interesting question- I got to see it from the patient perspective. I worked at a Diabetes Clinic for about 5 years. We had 2 providers, both nurse practitioners. One was very overweight and one that was thin. From a patient point of view, they would complain about both of them. Some patients didn't like the overweight one because they felt she couldn't give them healthy advice given she was overweight. They didn't like the thin one because they felt that she had no clue what they dealt with because she was thin and in shape.
Posted by nutritiongeek133:
I work in california at a well regarded hospital, and it drives me crazy to see all of the overweight people in healthcare! Our patients must think we are mad. Why is it that so many healthcare providers are out of shape and in horrible states of health? I may be biased because I specialize in nutrition, but it drives me crazy! The other day I met a dietician who was borderline obese. How does this occur?
I am an overweight dietitian. Two things: 1) Just because you know better doesn't mean you do better and 2) Don't be so judgmental Just because someone is obese doesn't mean they aren't walking the walk. Many people have disordered eating, thyroid issues, PCOS and other issues which make it difficult to keep weight under control. Healthcare practitioners are overweight for the same reasons you see nurses and doctors smoking outside hospitals because we are HUMAN. Another interesting point, patients often my open up to me much easier than my colleagues because they know that I can understand the challenges that they face. It is quite difficult for obese people to open up to "skinny" professional who don't know what they go through and because of fear of being judged as "lazy" or undisciplined. So maybe instead of being critical of other people for not walking the walk you can offer more compassion for healthcare professionals who STRUGGLE to walk the walk despite knowing the health risk.
Posted by nutritiongeek133:<BR>I work in california at a well regarded hospital, and it drives me crazy to see all of the overweight people in healthcare! Our patients must think we are mad. Why is it that so many healthcare providers are out of shape and in horrible states of health? I may be biased because I specialize in nutrition, but it drives me crazy! The other day I met a dietician who was borderline obese. How does this occur? I am an overweight dietitian. Two things: 1) Just because you know better doesn't mean you do better and 2) Don't be so judgmental Just because someone is obese doesn't mean they aren't walking the walk. Many people have disordered eating, thyroid issues, PCOS and other issues which make it difficult to keep weight under control. Healthcare practitioners are overweight for the same reasons you see nurses and doctors smoking outside hospitals because we are HUMAN. Another interesting point, patients often my open up to me much easier than my colleagues because they know that I can understand the challenges that they face. It is quite difficult for obese people to open up to "skinny" professional who don't know what they go through and because of fear of being judged as "lazy" or undisciplined. So maybe instead of being critical of other people for not walking the walk you can offer more compassion for healthcare professionals who STRUGGLE to walk the walk despite knowing the health risk.

Preach it girl! :) How can you know somebody isn't walking the walk just by looking at them? You can't. I have met overweight individuals who exercise more, eat better, and have better labs than people with a healthy BMI.

Preach it girl! :) How can you know somebody isn't walking the walk just by looking at them? You can't. I have met overweight individuals who exercise more, eat better, and have better labs than people with a healthy BMI.

I agree we should be compassionate, but make no mistake - it is NOT healthy to be obese. Excess weight is associated with myriad chronic diseases. We need to be able to set aside how we view people's habits (exercise, eating) and counsel objectively, and objectively obese people should lose weight. I'm not saying it is easy and isn't a struggle, of course it is, but we are not doing our jobs if we are not appropriately counseling obese individuals on the need for weight loss, regardless of exercise and eating habits (and remember - just because a food is considered healthful doesn't mean it's a free for all, I've seen lots of patients with healthful eating habits but they are eating way too much). And before anyone even says it - I know the BMI does not take body composition into account, but you all know we're not taking about bodybuilders or athletes here, we're talking about John Q Public.

I agree we should be compassionate, but make no mistake - it is NOT healthy to be obese. Excess weight is associated with myriad chronic diseases. We need to be able to set aside how we view people's habits (exercise, eating) and counsel objectively, and objectively obese people should lose weight. I'm not saying it is easy and isn't a struggle, of course it is, but we are not doing our jobs if we are not appropriately counseling obese individuals on the need for weight loss, regardless of exercise and eating habits (and remember - just because a food is considered healthful doesn't mean it's a free for all, I've seen lots of patients with healthful eating habits but they are eating way too much). And before anyone even says it - I know the BMI does not take body composition into account, but you all know we're not taking about bodybuilders or athletes here, we're talking about John Q Public.
Posted by GRD:
I agree we should be compassionate, but make no mistake - it is NOT healthy to be obese. Excess weight is associated with myriad chronic diseases. We need to be able to set aside how we view people's habits (exercise, eating) and counsel objectively, and objectively obese people should lose weight. I'm not saying it is easy and isn't a struggle, of course it is, but we are not doing our jobs if we are not appropriately counseling obese individuals on the need for weight loss, regardless of exercise and eating habits (and remember - just because a food is considered healthful doesn't mean it's a free for all, I've seen lots of patients with healthful eating habits but they are eating way too much). And before anyone even says it - I know the BMI does not take body composition into account, but you all know we're not taking about bodybuilders or athletes here, we're talking about John Q Public.
None of the replies listed state that being obese is healthy nor do they say the we shouldn't be working towards weight loss. I certainly did NOT say the we should be compassionate because being obese is fine. Your statement here makes sense but doesn't address the OP's initial ethos and statement.
Posted by GRD:<BR>I agree we should be compassionate, but make no mistake - it is NOT healthy to be obese. Excess weight is associated with myriad chronic diseases. We need to be able to set aside how we view people's habits (exercise, eating) and counsel objectively, and objectively obese people should lose weight. I'm not saying it is easy and isn't a struggle, of course it is, but we are not doing our jobs if we are not appropriately counseling obese individuals on the need for weight loss, regardless of exercise and eating habits (and remember - just because a food is considered healthful doesn't mean it's a free for all, I've seen lots of patients with healthful eating habits but they are eating way too much). And before anyone even says it - I know the BMI does not take body composition into account, but you all know we're not taking about bodybuilders or athletes here, we're talking about John Q Public. None of the replies listed state that being obese is healthy nor do they say the we shouldn't be working towards weight loss. I certainly did NOT say the we should be compassionate because being obese is fine. Your statement here makes sense but doesn't address the OP's initial ethos and statement.

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This is why Dietetics Programs are lacking in teaching counseling skills. No wonder obesity keeps going up despite the dietitian and nutrition professionals trying to keep people straight. They don't know how to do it. It's much more than giving information or lecturing about healthy eating. I hold both an advanced nutrition degree and a mental health counseling degree. I got my nutrition degree first, but got frustrated as to why people are not changing habits. So I decided to back to school after 10 years in the nutrition field and pursue a counseling degree and see if I can learn what is the cause of all this. One thing that I learned through my counseling is that change only happens when three conditions are present 1.The counselor is congruent with the client. 2.The counselor provides the client with unconditional positive regard. 3.The counselor shows empathetic understanding to the client. Only and only when these 3 are present can change happen. Most dietitians have no clue about any of those. I think I'll write a book on it!!

This is why Dietetics Programs are lacking in teaching counseling skills. No wonder obesity keeps going up despite the dietitian and nutrition professionals trying to keep people straight. They don't know how to do it. It's much more than giving information or lecturing about healthy eating. I hold both an advanced nutrition degree and a mental health counseling degree. I got my nutrition degree first, but got frustrated as to why people are not changing habits. So I decided to back to school after 10 years in the nutrition field and pursue a counseling degree and see if I can learn what is the cause of all this. One thing that I learned through my counseling is that change only happens when three conditions are present 1.The counselor is congruent with the client. 2.The counselor provides the client with unconditional positive regard. 3.The counselor shows empathetic understanding to the client. Only and only when these 3 are present can change happen. Most dietitians have no clue about any of those. I think I'll write a book on it!!
Posted by njroge71:
This is why Dietetics Programs are lacking in teaching counseling skills. No wonder obesity keeps going up despite the dietitian and nutrition professionals trying to keep people straight. They don't know how to do it. It's much more than giving information or lecturing about healthy eating. I hold both an advanced nutrition degree and a mental health counseling degree. I got my nutrition degree first, but got frustrated as to why people are not changing habits. So I decided to back to school after 10 years in the nutrition field and pursue a counseling degree and see if I can learn what is the cause of all this. One thing that I learned through my counseling is that change only happens when three conditions are present 1.The counselor is congruent with the client. 2.The counselor provides the client with unconditional positive regard. 3.The counselor shows empathetic understanding to the client. Only and only when these 3 are present can change happen. Most dietitians have no clue about any of those. I think I'll write a book on it!!
Obesity is going up for a variety of reasons. It's not solely the responsibility of the dietitian to control it. Being a good counselor does not guarantee that a patient will succeed either-people will still go for the bariatric surgeries if their insurance pays for it. It's the responsibility of each person to take control of their own health. We were required to take counseling classes in our internship and there is a lot of on the job learning that goes into it. With experience ones counseling skills will improve.
Posted by njroge71:<BR>This is why Dietetics Programs are lacking in teaching counseling skills. No wonder obesity keeps going up despite the dietitian and nutrition professionals trying to keep people straight. They don't know how to do it. It's much more than giving information or lecturing about healthy eating. I hold both an advanced nutrition degree and a mental health counseling degree. I got my nutrition degree first, but got frustrated as to why people are not changing habits. So I decided to back to school after 10 years in the nutrition field and pursue a counseling degree and see if I can learn what is the cause of all this. One thing that I learned through my counseling is that change only happens when three conditions are present 1.The counselor is congruent with the client. 2.The counselor provides the client with unconditional positive regard. 3.The counselor shows empathetic understanding to the client. Only and only when these 3 are present can change happen. Most dietitians have no clue about any of those. I think I'll write a book on it!! Obesity is going up for a variety of reasons. It's not solely the responsibility of the dietitian to control it. Being a good counselor does not guarantee that a patient will succeed either-people will still go for the bariatric surgeries if their insurance pays for it. It's the responsibility of each person to take control of their own health. We were required to take counseling classes in our internship and there is a lot of on the job learning that goes into it. With experience ones counseling skills will improve.
Posted by shandstar:
Posted by njroge71:
This is why Dietetics Programs are lacking in teaching counseling skills. No wonder obesity keeps going up despite the dietitian and nutrition professionals trying to keep people straight. They don't know how to do it. It's much more than giving information or lecturing about healthy eating. I hold both an advanced nutrition degree and a mental health counseling degree. I got my nutrition degree first, but got frustrated as to why people are not changing habits. So I decided to back to school after 10 years in the nutrition field and pursue a counseling degree and see if I can learn what is the cause of all this. One thing that I learned through my counseling is that change only happens when three conditions are present 1.The counselor is congruent with the client. 2.The counselor provides the client with unconditional positive regard. 3.The counselor shows empathetic understanding to the client. Only and only when these 3 are present can change happen. Most dietitians have no clue about any of those. I think I'll write a book on it!!
Obesity is going up for a variety of reasons. It's not solely the responsibility of the dietitian to control it. Being a good counselor does not guarantee that a patient will succeed either-people will still go for the bariatric surgeries if their insurance pays for it. It's the responsibility of each person to take control of their own health. We were required to take counseling classes in our internship and there is a lot of on the job learning that goes into it. With experience ones counseling skills will improve.
I totally agree with Shandstar- I had counseling classes getting my degree. But at the end of the day, a person can get many hours of nutrition "counseling" and still battle to eat right. People go to counselors for a variety of issues- addiction, anger problems, marriage problems, etc. Going to a counselor doesn't always help a person stop going back to bad habits. It has to be the person ready and willing to make the changes. Dietitians can give people tools, but at the end of the day, a person has to be willing to change.
Posted by shandstar:<BR>Posted by njroge71:<BR>This is why Dietetics Programs are lacking in teaching counseling skills. No wonder obesity keeps going up despite the dietitian and nutrition professionals trying to keep people straight. They don't know how to do it. It's much more than giving information or lecturing about healthy eating. I hold both an advanced nutrition degree and a mental health counseling degree. I got my nutrition degree first, but got frustrated as to why people are not changing habits. So I decided to back to school after 10 years in the nutrition field and pursue a counseling degree and see if I can learn what is the cause of all this. One thing that I learned through my counseling is that change only happens when three conditions are present 1.The counselor is congruent with the client. 2.The counselor provides the client with unconditional positive regard. 3.The counselor shows empathetic understanding to the client. Only and only when these 3 are present can change happen. Most dietitians have no clue about any of those. I think I'll write a book on it!! Obesity is going up for a variety of reasons. It's not solely the responsibility of the dietitian to control it. Being a good counselor does not guarantee that a patient will succeed either-people will still go for the bariatric surgeries if their insurance pays for it. It's the responsibility of each person to take control of their own health. We were required to take counseling classes in our internship and there is a lot of on the job learning that goes into it. With experience ones counseling skills will improve. I totally agree with Shandstar- I had counseling classes getting my degree. But at the end of the day, a person can get many hours of nutrition "counseling" and still battle to eat right. People go to counselors for a variety of issues- addiction, anger problems, marriage problems, etc. Going to a counselor doesn't always help a person stop going back to bad habits. It has to be the person ready and willing to make the changes. Dietitians can give people tools, but at the end of the day, a person has to be willing to change.
Posted by nutritiongeek133:
I work in california at a well regarded hospital, and it drives me crazy to see all of the overweight people in healthcare! Our patients must think we are mad. Why is it that so many healthcare providers are out of shape and in horrible states of health? I may be biased because I specialize in nutrition, but it drives me crazy! The other day I met a dietician who was borderline obese. How does this occur?
I agree on personal responsibility, but the comment above does not communicate a lot of empathy. Just a lot of blame. If you are going to help people, you have to start at a place of empathy and unconditional positive regard.
Posted by nutritiongeek133:<BR>I work in california at a well regarded hospital, and it drives me crazy to see all of the overweight people in healthcare! Our patients must think we are mad. Why is it that so many healthcare providers are out of shape and in horrible states of health? I may be biased because I specialize in nutrition, but it drives me crazy! The other day I met a dietician who was borderline obese. How does this occur? I agree on personal responsibility, but the comment above does not communicate a lot of empathy. Just a lot of blame. If you are going to help people, you have to start at a place of empathy and unconditional positive regard.

I work in california at a well regarded hospital, and it drives me crazy to see all of the overweight people in healthcare! Our patients must think we are mad. Why is it that so many healthcare providers are out of shape and in horrible states of health? I may be biased because I specialize in nutrition, but it drives me crazy!

The other day I met a dietician who was borderline obese. How does this occur?

My question is this, what about if dietitian's are on the other side of the spectrum? If they are visibly underweight, should they not be allowed to practice? I am genuinely curious to hear yours and everyone else's opinion, I don't have much of an opinion myself.

>I work in california at a well regarded hospital, and it drives me crazy to see all of the overweight people in healthcare! Our patients must think we are mad. Why is it that so many healthcare providers are out of shape and in horrible states of health? I may be biased because I specialize in nutrition, but it drives me crazy! >The other day I met a dietician who was borderline obese. How does this occur? My question is this, what about if dietitian's are on the other side of the spectrum? If they are visibly underweight, should they not be allowed to practice? I am genuinely curious to hear yours and everyone else's opinion, I don't have much of an opinion myself.

I don't think anyone's job skills or appropriateness for a job should be based on what they look like. I think in our field, honestly, we're screwed no matter what weight we are. Someone is always going to have an opinion. I had a coworker tell me recently that I eat the most normal of any dietitian they have ever seen. I took that as a compliment, but what a sad commentary on our profession. I know of a super thin RD, and I feel sad for her honestly. She couldn't sit still through lunch and had to go take a walk afterwards. Clearly to burn off the little bit of lunch she ate. What kind of message does that send? It's sad. I've seen super thin, skeletal aerobics/yoga instructors also. Our culture is so thin-obsessed, it's scary.

I don't think anyone's job skills or appropriateness for a job should be based on what they look like. I think in our field, honestly, we're screwed no matter what weight we are. Someone is always going to have an opinion. I had a coworker tell me recently that I eat the most normal of any dietitian they have ever seen. I took that as a compliment, but what a sad commentary on our profession. I know of a super thin RD, and I feel sad for her honestly. She couldn't sit still through lunch and had to go take a walk afterwards. Clearly to burn off the little bit of lunch she ate. What kind of message does that send? It's sad. I've seen super thin, skeletal aerobics/yoga instructors also. Our culture is so thin-obsessed, it's scary.

If obesity were a simple disease, we would all be thin. My ancestors lived through the Irish famine and settled in the United States. The famine created gene variations in the next generation that made losing weight very difficult. I had my 23&Me tested and together my integrative MD and I looked at my challenges. I should be fatter and sicker, but following a modified fat diet was a good choice for my genetics. My methylation and detox pathways are impacted by gene variants. The result is a high level of environmental chemicals are being stored in my tissues. Weight loss means they are released into my serum and cause headaches and chronic fatigue.

I finally decided to have an intragastric balloon placed to facilitate weight loss. I track my daily calories - 900 on average. I changed my supplementation routine because I know I am not getting enough nutrition. I work out (treadmill, iFit recumbent bike, and free weights daily). I have stalled in my weight loss after 20 pounds (my old set point weight). I am also tracking my uBiome - I have low diversity in my fecal microbiome. I make more of the the fermenters or Firmicutes bacteria, and they extract too many calories from food. I take probiotics/prebiotics, eat fermented foods, and drink Kombucha. I have made little progress in changing the Firmicutes/Bacteroidites ratio. I have healed my gut after having SIBO and have celiac disease. My answer to this is a very clean, very whole diet. I got rid of anything anti-bacterial and avoid pesticides in my diet and lawn. This must not be enough because I was just diagnosed with psoriasis, an autoimmune disease that is triggered by the environment.

So you can judge people who look like me. But you don't understand the totality of what we are fighting. If we do not get control of the environmental factors (access to physical activity, wholesome food, chemicals in the environment) we all will be fat one day.

If obesity were a simple disease, we would all be thin. My ancestors lived through the Irish famine and settled in the United States. The famine created gene variations in the next generation that made losing weight very difficult. I had my 23&Me tested and together my integrative MD and I looked at my challenges. I should be fatter and sicker, but following a modified fat diet was a good choice for my genetics. My methylation and detox pathways are impacted by gene variants. The result is a high level of environmental chemicals are being stored in my tissues. Weight loss means they are released into my serum and cause headaches and chronic fatigue. I finally decided to have an intragastric balloon placed to facilitate weight loss. I track my daily calories - 900 on average. I changed my supplementation routine because I know I am not getting enough nutrition. I work out (treadmill, iFit recumbent bike, and free weights daily). I have stalled in my weight loss after 20 pounds (my old set point weight). I am also tracking my uBiome - I have low diversity in my fecal microbiome. I make more of the the fermenters or Firmicutes bacteria, and they extract too many calories from food. I take probiotics/prebiotics, eat fermented foods, and drink Kombucha. I have made little progress in changing the Firmicutes/Bacteroidites ratio. I have healed my gut after having SIBO and have celiac disease. My answer to this is a very clean, very whole diet. I got rid of anything anti-bacterial and avoid pesticides in my diet and lawn. This must not be enough because I was just diagnosed with psoriasis, an autoimmune disease that is triggered by the environment. So you can judge people who look like me. But you don't understand the totality of what we are fighting. If we do not get control of the environmental factors (access to physical activity, wholesome food, chemicals in the environment) we all will be fat one day.

Wow- if we don't do something, we will all be fat one day. That is a bold statement. There will always be a percentage of the population that works hard at staying in shape and at a healthy weight. It may not be always a large percentage, but I give credit to those that work hard to beat the overweight/obesity odds.

Wow- if we don't do something, we will all be fat one day. That is a bold statement. There will always be a percentage of the population that works hard at staying in shape and at a healthy weight. It may not be always a large percentage, but I give credit to those that work hard to beat the overweight/obesity odds.

Where does it state obesity makes people lazy and depressed? That comes from all the commercials for weight loss surgery that states if one has surgery they'll be "happy, healthy, beautiful, & productive". Just because an individual is obese does NOT mean they're lazy, ugly, & depressed! I'm sorry, but maybe you need to read the study completed by the Academy several years ago that showed we work with a bunch of discriminatory people who believe an obese person could NEVER do a good job as a Registered Dietitian. First, I believe you need to read their history and understand dietitian has been spelled with a "t" since the. 1900's. Second, I believe you need to develop compassion and understand an obese RD can & does provide objective information and the obese RD many obese clients feel comfortable speaking with as they don't ever believe a skinny RD would understand. Third, you don't know the obese RD to know what they've had happen in their life. Do they have a metabolic condition? Have they had to take medication that caused weight gain? Is there a reason why the individual cannot exercise? Unless you've walked a mile in another's moccasin don't ever judge another individual. If I see an RD who is size 2 should I make the assumption they don't care about themselves and they also have an eating disorder? I don't, but I've seen many interns I did wonder if they had an eating disorder.
Obese RD's just like size 2 RD's can be happy, productive,& beautiful in their respective states, however neither maybe healthy!

Where does it state obesity makes people lazy and depressed? That comes from all the commercials for weight loss surgery that states if one has surgery they'll be "happy, healthy, beautiful, & productive". Just because an individual is obese does NOT mean they're lazy, ugly, & depressed! I'm sorry, but maybe you need to read the study completed by the Academy several years ago that showed we work with a bunch of discriminatory people who believe an obese person could NEVER do a good job as a Registered Dietitian. First, I believe you need to read their history and understand dietitian has been spelled with a "t" since the. 1900's. Second, I believe you need to develop compassion and understand an obese RD can & does provide objective information and the obese RD many obese clients feel comfortable speaking with as they don't ever believe a skinny RD would understand. Third, you don't know the obese RD to know what they've had happen in their life. Do they have a metabolic condition? Have they had to take medication that caused weight gain? Is there a reason why the individual cannot exercise? Unless you've walked a mile in another's moccasin don't ever judge another individual. If I see an RD who is size 2 should I make the assumption they don't care about themselves and they also have an eating disorder? I don't, but I've seen many interns I did wonder if they had an eating disorder. Obese RD's just like size 2 RD's can be happy, productive,& beautiful in their respective states, however neither maybe healthy!
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