Microbiome and Gastrointestinal Tract
DIET AND SUPPLEMENTS TO PROMOTE A HEALTHY MICROBIOME AND GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT
As Hippocrates said, "All diseases begin in the gut." Research is growing on the need to treat the gut first to achieve a microbiome and gut lining which supports total body health. In this webinar, we will explore the microbiome, the intestinal lining and how diet and certain supplements can hurt or hinder both.
Upon successful completion of this one-hour course, the participant should be able to:
  • Provide a brief overview of the microbiome.


  • Define the concept of leaky gut or increased gastrointestinal permeability.


  • Discuss key nutrients needed to support the health and balance of the microbiome and maintain the integrity of the tight junctions of the intestine.


  • Utilize research on supplements which may support a healthy microbiome and maintain integrity of the intestinal lining in the treatment and care of patients.
Live Webinar Date: Feb 12, 2019   (04:00 PM - 05:00 PM EST)
Course Categories / Learning Need Codes (LNC): 2070, 2100, 3100, 5220
Performance Indicators/Learning Objectives: 8.1.1, 8.1.3, 8.3.1, 8.3.6
Target Audience: RDs, DTRs, Health Professionals
Number of Credits: 1.0
Level(s): 1, 2
Total Cost: $18

About the Presenter: Tami Best, MS, RDN, CDN
Tami Best

Tami Best MS, RDN, CDN earned a Bachelor of Science in Nutrition and Dietetics from Kent State University; a Master of Science in Nutrition and Dietetics from East Carolina University; is a graduate of The Cleveland Clinic Foundation Dietetic Internship and has completed advanced training and certification programs in Functional Nutrition from the Institute of Functional Medicine and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. She is an avid runner, having qualified for and completed the 2016 Boston Marathon. Tami has more than 25 years of healthcare-related experience, specializes in Functional Nutrition, and is the owner of Promise of Vitality. Her company helps to build a world free of chronic disease caused by intake of highly processed foods, overexposure to environmental toxins and uncontrolled stress.