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Career Talk: Future of dietetics?
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01/30/08 07:16 AM | Edit ReplyReply   |    Future of dietetics?
Terrapin
34 Posts

Registered Dietitian

I've been lurking around for a while, but I figured I'd finally post a question to everyone. Quick background, I've been a Diet Tech for 9 years in LTC facilities, and am in my final semester of my bachelor's degree in dietetics. I"m currently trying to get everything together for my DI applications.

My question to all the RD's is this, in my limited experience, it doesn't seem that most RDs get the pay and respect they deserve, considering all the education required. RD's seem to be near the bottom of the respect level, below RNs, LPNs, speech therapist, PT's, OT's, etc. My question is, how did it get this way? And, will it ever change? I certainly don't expect miracles, but I know RDs locally that make less money than LPNs.

I know the ADA is considering eliminating the Diet Tech position (which is why I pursued my RD), and even considering requiring RD's to have Masters Degrees. And you know what, I hope they do! I hope they make it so unbelievably hard to get your RD degree, that there will eventually be a national shortage, much like in nursing. Okay, maybe I'm just venting a bit, but these last two years have been hell, and I don't have very much confidence in finding a good job when I do finish everything.

01/30/08 08:57 AM | Edit ReplyReply   |    RE: Future of dietetics?
MonigueJ
284 Posts
Chicago
Registered Dietitian


    Posted by Scott17:
    I've been lurking around for a while, but I figured I'd finally post a question to everyone. Quick background, I've been a Diet Tech for 9 years in LTC facilities, and am in my final semester of my bachelor's degree in dietetics. I"m currently trying to get everything together for my DI applications.

    My question to all the RD's is this, in my limited experience, it doesn't seem that most RDs get the pay and respect they deserve, considering all the education required. RD's seem to be near the bottom of the respect level, below RNs, LPNs, speech therapist, PT's, OT's, etc. My question is, how did it get this way? And, will it ever change? I certainly don't expect miracles, but I know RDs locally that make less money than LPNs.

    I know the ADA is considering eliminating the Diet Tech position (which is why I pursued my RD), and even considering requiring RD's to have Masters Degrees. And you know what, I hope they do! I hope they make it so unbelievably hard to get your RD degree, that there will eventually be a national shortage, much like in nursing. Okay, maybe I'm just venting a bit, but these last two years have been hell, and I don't have very much confidence in finding a good job when I do finish everything.


The one thing that newcomers in nutrition must realize... that LTC and clinical nutrition isn't the only route to go. You've spent 9 years in LTC, WHY? venture out and speak with other RD that have exciting and interesting careers. I've met RD that edit Food and Nutrition magazines, Have their private businesses, community RD's, corperate RD's, USDA & FDA RD's, Renal RD's Home health RD's and etc.

You have to make this profession work for you...Not you work for them. Remember you choice this profession for a reason, now rethink it and make it work.

This is the only profession in my opionin, that have a reason for everything that they do. Why do we use Ireton-Jones equation or the BEE and why we assess energy needs of our participants. The difference between a RD,CDE and RN CDE

01/30/08 09:46 AM | Edit ReplyReply   |    RE: Future of dietetics?
Terrapin
34 Posts

Registered Dietitian


    Posted by MonigueJ:

      Posted by Scott17:
      I've been lurking around for a while, but I figured I'd finally post a question to everyone. Quick background, I've been a Diet Tech for 9 years in LTC facilities, and am in my final semester of my bachelor's degree in dietetics. I"m currently trying to get everything together for my DI applications.

      My question to all the RD's is this, in my limited experience, it doesn't seem that most RDs get the pay and respect they deserve, considering all the education required. RD's seem to be near the bottom of the respect level, below RNs, LPNs, speech therapist, PT's, OT's, etc. My question is, how did it get this way? And, will it ever change? I certainly don't expect miracles, but I know RDs locally that make less money than LPNs.

      I know the ADA is considering eliminating the Diet Tech position (which is why I pursued my RD), and even considering requiring RD's to have Masters Degrees. And you know what, I hope they do! I hope they make it so unbelievably hard to get your RD degree, that there will eventually be a national shortage, much like in nursing. Okay, maybe I'm just venting a bit, but these last two years have been hell, and I don't have very much confidence in finding a good job when I do finish everything.


    The one thing that newcomers in nutrition must realize... that LTC and clinical nutrition isn't the only route to go. You've spent 9 years in LTC, WHY? venture out and speak with other RD that have exciting and interesting careers. I've met RD that edit Food and Nutrition magazines, Have their private businesses, community RD's, corperate RD's, USDA & FDA RD's, Renal RD's Home health RD's and etc.

    You have to make this profession work for you...Not you work for them. Remember you choice this profession for a reason, now rethink it and make it work.

    This is the only profession in my opionin, that have a reason for everything that they do. Why do we use Ireton-Jones equation or the BEE and why we assess energy needs of our participants. The difference between a RD,CDE and RN CDE


I know I'm sounding negative about the profession, and I don't really mean to. I've been at this job for 9 years because there is basically ZERO need for Diet Tech's anywhere. It just gets frustrating opening the Sunday classified ads every week and seeing 50 RN postings w/ huge sign-on bonuses, and not one RD or DTR posting, ever.

01/30/08 11:16 AM | Edit ReplyReply   |    Why pursue Dietetics?
nduthu
61 Posts

General Public

I am actually in the process of considering a career change to nursing. If I were you, I would have gone back to school for two years to an RN credential instead of RD. I have a masters in nutrition and I would never advice anyone to get into this profession. A younger sister of mine asked my opinion about pursuing RD and I actually discouraged her. It would take her 5 years ( 4 years course work and 1 year intership) and will actually be making less compared to going for 3 years to nursing school and earing RN credential). I have been in this job for 7 years only making $20/hr in the midwest. My two sisters, who just came to the US last year have already started nursing programs and I gurantee you in 3 years time they will be making an equal pay with me when they only have an associates degree and I have a masters degree--go figure:). In another five years time, they can probably double my salary just by picking 8 hours of overtime each week.

I have decided I have tolet go of my pride, go back to school and start at the bottom of the nursing profession, become an RN and then pursue MSN to become a nurse practioner. Otherwise if I do nothing I will be singing the same song 10 year from now. Can you imagine nurses work upto 4 days off if they work twelve hour shifts? I think this is a better career even when raising a family.

01/30/08 11:32 AM | Edit ReplyReply   |    RE: Future of dietetics?
kc26
74 Posts

Dietetic Technician

Hi Scott,

I'm from California (you know who I am!) and I see lots of jobs for DTRs in CA in all areas of nutrition (clinical, community, etc.). The DTR program I was enrolled in actually had a very high enrollment. It appears that some areas of the country tend to make more use of DTRs than others. I worked at one hospital that had just as many DTRs on staff as RDS, and I know the RDs really appreciated the DTRs.

Of course, you know I'm not very high on the nutrition profession right now, especially the ADA.


    Posted by Scott17:
    I've been lurking around for a while, but I figured I'd finally post a question to everyone. Quick background, I've been a Diet Tech for 9 years in LTC facilities, and am in my final semester of my bachelor's degree in dietetics. I"m currently trying to get everything together for my DI applications.

    My question to all the RD's is this, in my limited experience, it doesn't seem that most RDs get the pay and respect they deserve, considering all the education required. RD's seem to be near the bottom of the respect level, below RNs, LPNs, speech therapist, PT's, OT's, etc. My question is, how did it get this way? And, will it ever change? I certainly don't expect miracles, but I know RDs locally that make less money than LPNs.

    I know the ADA is considering eliminating the Diet Tech position (which is why I pursued my RD), and even considering requiring RD's to have Masters Degrees. And you know what, I hope they do! I hope they make it so unbelievably hard to get your RD degree, that there will eventually be a national shortage, much like in nursing. Okay, maybe I'm just venting a bit, but these last two years have been hell, and I don't have very much confidence in finding a good job when I do finish everything.


01/30/08 12:33 PM | Edit ReplyReply   |    not so
sms
5 Posts

Registered Dietitian

Hi, I appreciated your response to my post about FNP considering RD. Thought I'd just throw my two cents in here. I have a lot of experience as a RN then as a FNP and I have to say that most of the physicians,nurses and NP's I have worked with have tremendous respect for the RD. They are always the first one we call with any feeding problems, weight issues or any other nutrition related question. Now this has been in pediatrics so nutrition is extremely important. I guess my point is make sure you go into a specialty where you are respected. If you start a job and don't feel like your position/input is valued definitely look elsewhere because there are many other places that need a good RD desperately! Good luck! Shannon

01/30/08 04:07 PM | Edit ReplyReply   |    RE: Why pursue Dietetics?
karimac
78 Posts
Madison WI
Registered Dietitian


    Posted by nduthu:
    I am actually in the process of considering a career change to nursing. If I were you, I would have gone back to school for two years to an RN credential instead of RD. I have a masters in nutrition and I would never advice anyone to get into this profession. A younger sister of mine asked my opinion about pursuing RD and I actually discouraged her. It would take her 5 years ( 4 years course work and 1 year intership) and will actually be making less compared to going for 3 years to nursing school and earing RN credential). I have been in this job for 7 years only making $20/hr in the midwest. My two sisters, who just came to the US last year have already started nursing programs and I gurantee you in 3 years time they will be making an equal pay with me when they only have an associates degree and I have a masters degree--go figure:). In another five years time, they can probably double my salary just by picking 8 hours of overtime each week.

    I have decided I have tolet go of my pride, go back to school and start at the bottom of the nursing profession, become an RN and then pursue MSN to become a nurse practioner. Otherwise if I do nothing I will be singing the same song 10 year from now. Can you imagine nurses work upto 4 days off if they work twelve hour shifts? I think this is a better career even when raising a family.


I agree. I just finished a year of applying to internships and I'm SO FRUSTRATED! Either I don't have a stellar GPA (the schools I applied to say they accept at 3.0 but really they'r elooking for a 3.8 or 4.0) or loads of clinical experience. I spent my entire undergrad working and paying for school, helping out my widowed mother with my six brothers and sisters, and being a full time student. My experiences/volunteer work was more in community nutrition and working with kids. I have zero interest in working in a clinical setting. Anyway, no one seemed to care that I had good time management skills, a good work ethic, and most of empathy for others. I also had some great experiences working with children with eating disorders, digestive issues, etc. Its so frustrating that so many internships care so much about your GPA and past clinical experiences. Does one with a better GPA make a better RD? If you have 500 years of clinical expereince working as a food service worker on the tray lines does that make you better at dealing with a crying mother who can't get her child to eat or an overweight man on the verge of giving up working to lose weight? I seriously doubt it. So, I'm persuing a masters in counseling....marriage and family therapy and sexual therapy. I love the counseling aspect of nutrition, love helping others trhough problems, being empathetic to one who is struggling and helping someone work through their problems. I have to wonder about the future of dietetics......there are women on the TODAY show who work in fashion and editing magazines giving diet and nutrition advice, the main "diet expert" they feature on the today show calls herself a nutritionist (!) and doctors are giving mothers advice about what to feed their kid instead of referring her to an RD. Thats our job....Even Dr. Phil gives out weight loss advice and anyone who's lost some weight thinks they are an expert on the subject....look at the Kimkins craze. I wouldn't encourage a young woman or man to get into the field. I would suggest they spend their time working towards a more respected career, one they will be valued for their knowledge and be compensated accordingly. Thats just me though......no intent to offend anyone.

01/30/08 05:57 PM | Edit ReplyReply   |    RE: Why pursue Dietetics?
MonigueJ
284 Posts
Chicago
Registered Dietitian


    Posted by karimac:

      Posted by nduthu:
      I am actually in the process of considering a career change to nursing. If I were you, I would have gone back to school for two years to an RN credential instead of RD. I have a masters in nutrition and I would never advice anyone to get into this profession. A younger sister of mine asked my opinion about pursuing RD and I actually discouraged her. It would take her 5 years ( 4 years course work and 1 year intership) and will actually be making less compared to going for 3 years to nursing school and earing RN credential). I have been in this job for 7 years only making $20/hr in the midwest. My two sisters, who just came to the US last year have already started nursing programs and I gurantee you in 3 years time they will be making an equal pay with me when they only have an associates degree and I have a masters degree--go figure:). In another five years time, they can probably double my salary just by picking 8 hours of overtime each week.

      I have decided I have tolet go of my pride, go back to school and start at the bottom of the nursing profession, become an RN and then pursue MSN to become a nurse practioner. Otherwise if I do nothing I will be singing the same song 10 year from now. Can you imagine nurses work upto 4 days off if they work twelve hour shifts? I think this is a better career even when raising a family.


    I agree. I just finished a year of applying to internships and I'm SO FRUSTRATED! Either I don't have a stellar GPA (the schools I applied to say they accept at 3.0 but really they'r elooking for a 3.8 or 4.0) or loads of clinical experience. I spent my entire undergrad working and paying for school, helping out my widowed mother with my six brothers and sisters, and being a full time student. My experiences/volunteer work was more in community nutrition and working with kids. I have zero interest in working in a clinical setting. Anyway, no one seemed to care that I had good time management skills, a good work ethic, and most of empathy for others. I also had some great experiences working with children with eating disorders, digestive issues, etc. Its so frustrating that so many internships care so much about your GPA and past clinical experiences. Does one with a better GPA make a better RD? If you have 500 years of clinical expereince working as a food service worker on the tray lines does that make you better at dealing with a crying mother who can't get her child to eat or an overweight man on the verge of giving up working to lose weight? I seriously doubt it. So, I'm persuing a masters in counseling....marriage and family therapy and sexual therapy. I love the counseling aspect of nutrition, love helping others trhough problems, being empathetic to one who is struggling and helping someone work through their problems. I have to wonder about the future of dietetics......there are women on the TODAY show who work in fashion and editing magazines giving diet and nutrition advice, the main "diet expert" they feature on the today show calls herself a nutritionist (!) and doctors are giving mothers advice about what to feed their kid instead of referring her to an RD. Thats our job....Even Dr. Phil gives out weight loss advice and anyone who's lost some weight thinks they are an expert on the subject....look at the Kimkins craze. I wouldn't encourage a young woman or man to get into the field. I would suggest they spend their time working towards a more respected career, one they will be valued for their knowledge and be compensated accordingly. Thats just me though......no intent to offend anyone.


I'm so sorry to hear about your frustration! Did you apply to internships that made GPA number 2 or 3 on their list? There are really a lot on internhsips. However, the price range from Free- or stipend( maybe 2 in US) ... TO $1,500 to $35,000 with or with out a masters, coordinated and etc...

Don't give up...Try and volunteer with a RD in the clinical setting. Ask your professor to call/write a recommendation to those hospitals near your home and ask for a part-time job exclusively working with the RD. It can be done.

They always talk about legal issues. JCAHO don't regulate that, that's a sure way to keep the DPD programs afloat. Do you know the difference between you (BS degree & DPD certifcate of completion of DPD course work)working in the hopsital as oppose to an intern... MONEY. that's all, those interns have the exact same qualification you have, they just paid for the internship.

If those fail, take your state licensure examination and become licensed dietitian. Work in LTC. But, after you relax reapply into an internship this time with clinical experience. Yes, It's a pain, however, it will come in handy one day.

Good Luck!

01/31/08 08:45 AM | Edit ReplyReply   |    RE: Why pursue Dietetics?
karimac
78 Posts
Madison WI
Registered Dietitian


    Posted by MonigueJ:

      Posted by karimac:

        Posted by nduthu:
        I am actually in the process of considering a career change to nursing. If I were you, I would have gone back to school for two years to an RN credential instead of RD. I have a masters in nutrition and I would never advice anyone to get into this profession. A younger sister of mine asked my opinion about pursuing RD and I actually discouraged her. It would take her 5 years ( 4 years course work and 1 year intership) and will actually be making less compared to going for 3 years to nursing school and earing RN credential). I have been in this job for 7 years only making $20/hr in the midwest. My two sisters, who just came to the US last year have already started nursing programs and I gurantee you in 3 years time they will be making an equal pay with me when they only have an associates degree and I have a masters degree--go figure:). In another five years time, they can probably double my salary just by picking 8 hours of overtime each week.

        I have decided I have tolet go of my pride, go back to school and start at the bottom of the nursing profession, become an RN and then pursue MSN to become a nurse practioner. Otherwise if I do nothing I will be singing the same song 10 year from now. Can you imagine nurses work upto 4 days off if they work twelve hour shifts? I think this is a better career even when raising a family.


      I agree. I just finished a year of applying to internships and I'm SO FRUSTRATED! Either I don't have a stellar GPA (the schools I applied to say they accept at 3.0 but really they'r elooking for a 3.8 or 4.0) or loads of clinical experience. I spent my entire undergrad working and paying for school, helping out my widowed mother with my six brothers and sisters, and being a full time student. My experiences/volunteer work was more in community nutrition and working with kids. I have zero interest in working in a clinical setting. Anyway, no one seemed to care that I had good time management skills, a good work ethic, and most of empathy for others. I also had some great experiences working with children with eating disorders, digestive issues, etc. Its so frustrating that so many internships care so much about your GPA and past clinical experiences. Does one with a better GPA make a better RD? If you have 500 years of clinical expereince working as a food service worker on the tray lines does that make you better at dealing with a crying mother who can't get her child to eat or an overweight man on the verge of giving up working to lose weight? I seriously doubt it. So, I'm persuing a masters in counseling....marriage and family therapy and sexual therapy. I love the counseling aspect of nutrition, love helping others trhough problems, being empathetic to one who is struggling and helping someone work through their problems. I have to wonder about the future of dietetics......there are women on the TODAY show who work in fashion and editing magazines giving diet and nutrition advice, the main "diet expert" they feature on the today show calls herself a nutritionist (!) and doctors are giving mothers advice about what to feed their kid instead of referring her to an RD. Thats our job....Even Dr. Phil gives out weight loss advice and anyone who's lost some weight thinks they are an expert on the subject....look at the Kimkins craze. I wouldn't encourage a young woman or man to get into the field. I would suggest they spend their time working towards a more respected career, one they will be valued for their knowledge and be compensated accordingly. Thats just me though......no intent to offend anyone.


    I'm so sorry to hear about your frustration! Did you apply to internships that made GPA number 2 or 3 on their list? There are really a lot on internhsips. However, the price range from Free- or stipend( maybe 2 in US) ... TO $1,500 to $35,000 with or with out a masters, coordinated and etc...

    Don't give up...Try and volunteer with a RD in the clinical setting. Ask your professor to call/write a recommendation to those hospitals near your home and ask for a part-time job exclusively working with the RD. It can be done.

    They always talk about legal issues. JCAHO don't regulate that, that's a sure way to keep the DPD programs afloat. Do you know the difference between you (BS degree & DPD certifcate of completion of DPD course work)working in the hopsital as oppose to an intern... MONEY. that's all, those interns have the exact same qualification you have, they just paid for the internship.

    If those fail, take your state licensure examination and become licensed dietitian. Work in LTC. But, after you relax reapply into an internship this time with clinical experience. Yes, It's a pain, however, it will come in handy one day.

    Good Luck!


Thank you for your kind words of encouragement. However, I'm okay with not being in the world of dietetics right now. I have no desire to do an internship, pay thousands of dollars to work ridiculous hours for free. I'd rather spend my time and money working towards something I really enjoy. If I can utilize my knowledge of nutrition in the process, awesome. If not, that's okay too.

01/31/08 09:15 AM | Edit ReplyReply   |    i understand
spice
68 Posts

Registered Dietitian

karimac- I had similar trouble getting into the internship the first go around. Everyone seemed to doubt my abilities purely based on my GPA. I just went straight into grad school and got in the next year. Turns out I was the first one of my graduating class to pass the RD exam and get a job. That said, I completely understand you not wanting to stay in the field. If I could do it all over I'd be a PA or maybe an OT/PT. Counseling seems like a great area too!

A far as people in the media go, there will always be "experts" in our field who haven't had a lick of training. And I believe the TODAY show nutritionist you mentioned is Joy Bauer, who's actually an RD. I don't know why she calls herself a nutritionist, but then again that's the household term people know. I wish we could claim it.

01/31/08 10:26 AM | Edit ReplyReply   |    RE: i understand
karimac
78 Posts
Madison WI
Registered Dietitian


    Posted by spice:
    karimac- I had similar trouble getting into the internship the first go around. Everyone seemed to doubt my abilities purely based on my GPA. I just went straight into grad school and got in the next year. Turns out I was the first one of my graduating class to pass the RD exam and get a job. That said, I completely understand you not wanting to stay in the field. If I could do it all over I'd be a PA or maybe an OT/PT. Counseling seems like a great area too!

    A far as people in the media go, there will always be "experts" in our field who haven't had a lick of training. And I believe the TODAY show nutritionist you mentioned is Joy Bauer, who's actually an RD. I don't know why she calls herself a nutritionist, but then again that's the household term people know. I wish we could claim it.


You know Spice I thought she might be an RD. I've never actually looked at her credentials. I wish she wouldn't call herself a nutritionist, it just confuses people. Maybe she could eventually drop the nutritioist and use her proper title.

Thaks for the words of understanding. It seems whenever I talk about my decision to do something different, I get ideas on how to change my mind. I appreciate that, but sometimes I just want to hear "its okay to move on, I understand why you may want to". Thanks Spice for doing that :D

01/31/08 12:29 PM | Edit ReplyReply   |    RE: Future of dietetics?
mlaRD
37 Posts
TX
Registered Dietitian

I am responding based on my experiance. I have been a clinical RD for almost 6 years now. I enjoy my job and do seem to have respect from other disciplines. Not from all, but enough to help making my career enjoyable. From my experiance-- that has mainly been clinical, there are occasions where I have to work a little bit harder to earn respect from a doctor or nurse because they have been discouraged by something that happened in the past, right or wrong, from another RD. If you get no respect no matter how hard you work and how good your recommendations, outcomes are, then there is a problem with where you are--facility, staff, etc.

I really enjoy clinical, but know it is not for everyone. I agree with the other postings, clincial is not the only option out there. I guess that is one of the nice parts about being an RD, the options for other opportunities are out there, you just may have to look a little harder.

As far as salary, you have to ask for what you are worth, and if you are not satisfied with the salary offered then try another place. I work with interns frequently at my current job and they tell me that they do not care what they make as long as they get a pay check after internship completion. I have been there to, and understand that after the internship that paycheck is welcome no matter what amount, but also this practice may be leading to holding us back if everyone is willing to take what ever pay is offered and not ask for what we are worth.

There are frustrations in every profession, not only our field. If you really want to be a dietitian that is great, you can help us continue to strive to improve our image. If you want to move on that is okay to. Good luck in what you decide to pursue!

Also, Every hospital that I have worked in have had postitions for DTRs, and usually we fill them with applicants with bachelors degree in nutrition because we do not have DTRs applicants. It could be the areas where I have worked.

01/31/08 12:47 PM | Edit ReplyReply   |    RE: Future of dietetics?
karimac
78 Posts
Madison WI
Registered Dietitian


    Posted by Scott17:
    I've been lurking around for a while, but I figured I'd finally post a question to everyone. Quick background, I've been a Diet Tech for 9 years in LTC facilities, and am in my final semester of my bachelor's degree in dietetics. I"m currently trying to get everything together for my DI applications.

    My question to all the RD's is this, in my limited experience, it doesn't seem that most RDs get the pay and respect they deserve, considering all the education required. RD's seem to be near the bottom of the respect level, below RNs, LPNs, speech therapist, PT's, OT's, etc. My question is, how did it get this way? And, will it ever change? I certainly don't expect miracles, but I know RDs locally that make less money than LPNs.

    I know the ADA is considering eliminating the Diet Tech position (which is why I pursued my RD), and even considering requiring RD's to have Masters Degrees. And you know what, I hope they do! I hope they make it so unbelievably hard to get your RD degree, that there will eventually be a national shortage, much like in nursing. Okay, maybe I'm just venting a bit, but these last two years have been hell, and I don't have very much confidence in finding a good job when I do finish everything.


While there are frustrations in every field, one can only take so much frustration before she needs to find some new frustrations/challenges to deal with. If you really really think being an RD is for you, go for it. Do it for awhile, if its not working for you or you want a change, take the new road. Who says you have to choose one career forever? Its not that way anymore. Going back to school when one is in their 40s or 50s is not uncommon now. So see if you like it, if not do something else.

01/31/08 05:10 PM | Edit ReplyReply   |    dieteics
peacelove
271 Posts
Atlanta GA
Registered Dietitian

I think it is important to point out, like some of you did that clinical nutrition is not the only route. One of our interns this week realized that one of our RD's, is the culinary RD, she said "wow, there really is a lot of different things to do". I have had my venting points as an RD, just a few months ago, i posted a "burnout" post. Since then I have changed jobs, increased my salary and starting an online graduate program. I realize now that i was so STUNTED in my growth in my last job, i was bored and did not have peers to help me improve my skills. I also realize now that SCHOOL was my real answer. I really enjoy my new job, when at first i did not becuase it was a bigger change than expected going from clinical to community. but now i see all the benefits, each day i learn something new. I am pursuing a degree in Youth Development and have realized that this will open up MANY new doors for me. Yes, i can still do health education, but now I will not be limited to just nutrition. Sometimes we do need a career change or at least another avenue. I think it is important to pursue school or a new avenue based on your interests and not thinking 'how much money can I make'. I chose this profession based on my passion and I will always have a passion for health, while changing my focus a bit to expand. We do have a long way to go as a profession, yet we do good work, whether anyone notices or respects it.

02/02/08 01:55 PM | Edit ReplyReply   |    dieteics
jbrd
131 Posts

Registered Dietitian


    Posted by peacelove:
    I think it is important to point out, like some of you did that clinical nutrition is not the only route. One of our interns this week realized that one of our RD's, is the culinary RD, she said "wow, there really is a lot of different things to do". I have had my venting points as an RD, just a few months ago, i posted a "burnout" post. Since then I have changed jobs, increased my salary and starting an online graduate program. I realize now that i was so STUNTED in my growth in my last job, i was bored and did not have peers to help me improve my skills. I also realize now that SCHOOL was my real answer. I really enjoy my new job, when at first i did not becuase it was a bigger change than expected going from clinical to community. but now i see all the benefits, each day i learn something new. I am pursuing a degree in Youth Development and have realized that this will open up MANY new doors for me. Yes, i can still do health education, but now I will not be limited to just nutrition. Sometimes we do need a career change or at least another avenue. I think it is important to pursue school or a new avenue based on your interests and not thinking 'how much money can I make'. I chose this profession based on my passion and I will always have a passion for health, while changing my focus a bit to expand. We do have a long way to go as a profession, yet we do good work, whether anyone notices or respects it.

That sounds great! I am looking into PhD programs now, not in nutrition. I won't lose my credentials or anything but definitely am looking for another field to combine with my background now.

[Edited by jbrd on 02/02/08 02:13 PM]

09/29/12 08:24 AM | Edit ReplyReply   |    RE: Future of dietetics?
EVE
2 Posts
Miami Beach FL
Educator


    Posted by Terrapin:
    I've been lurking around for a while, but I figured I'd finally post a question to everyone. Quick background, I've been a Diet Tech for 9 years in LTC facilities, and am in my final semester of my bachelor's degree in dietetics. I"m currently trying to get everything together for my DI applications.

    My question to all the RD's is this, in my limited experience, it doesn't seem that most RDs get the pay and respect they deserve, considering all the education required. RD's seem to be near the bottom of the respect level, below RNs, LPNs, speech therapist, PT's, OT's, etc. My question is, how did it get this way? And, will it ever change? I certainly don't expect miracles, but I know RDs locally that make less money than LPNs.

    I know the ADA is considering eliminating the Diet Tech position (which is why I pursued my RD), and even considering requiring RD's to have Masters Degrees. And you know what, I hope they do! I hope they make it so unbelievably hard to get your RD degree, that there will eventually be a national shortage, much like in nursing. Okay, maybe I'm just venting a bit, but these last two years have been hell, and I don't have very much confidence in finding a good job when I do finish everything.


09/29/12 08:24 AM | Edit ReplyReply   |    RE: Future of dietetics?
EVE
2 Posts
Miami Beach FL
Educator


    Posted by Terrapin:
    I've been lurking around for a while, but I figured I'd finally post a question to everyone. Quick background, I've been a Diet Tech for 9 years in LTC facilities, and am in my final semester of my bachelor's degree in dietetics. I"m currently trying to get everything together for my DI applications.

    My question to all the RD's is this, in my limited experience, it doesn't seem that most RDs get the pay and respect they deserve, considering all the education required. RD's seem to be near the bottom of the respect level, below RNs, LPNs, speech therapist, PT's, OT's, etc. My question is, how did it get this way? And, will it ever change? I certainly don't expect miracles, but I know RDs locally that make less money than LPNs.

    I know the ADA is considering eliminating the Diet Tech position (which is why I pursued my RD), and even considering requiring RD's to have Masters Degrees. And you know what, I hope they do! I hope they make it so unbelievably hard to get your RD degree, that there will eventually be a national shortage, much like in nursing. Okay, maybe I'm just venting a bit, but these last two years have been hell, and I don't have very much confidence in finding a good job when I do finish everything.


09/30/12 12:55 AM | Edit ReplyReply   |    RE: Future of dietetics?
shandstar
1175 Posts
Lewisville TX
Registered Dietitian


    Posted by EVE:

      Posted by Terrapin:
      I've been lurking around for a while, but I figured I'd finally post a question to everyone. Quick background, I've been a Diet Tech for 9 years in LTC facilities, and am in my final semester of my bachelor's degree in dietetics. I"m currently trying to get everything together for my DI applications.

      My question to all the RD's is this, in my limited experience, it doesn't seem that most RDs get the pay and respect they deserve, considering all the education required. RD's seem to be near the bottom of the respect level, below RNs, LPNs, speech therapist, PT's, OT's, etc. My question is, how did it get this way? And, will it ever change? I certainly don't expect miracles, but I know RDs locally that make less money than LPNs.

      I know the ADA is considering eliminating the Diet Tech position (which is why I pursued my RD), and even considering requiring RD's to have Masters Degrees. And you know what, I hope they do! I hope they make it so unbelievably hard to get your RD degree, that there will eventually be a national shortage, much like in nursing. Okay, maybe I'm just venting a bit, but these last two years have been hell, and I don't have very much confidence in finding a good job when I do finish everything.



It depends on the area but here in Texas there's plenty of jobs. I used to think the way you did when I was in my internship- the RDs in my clinicals were unhappy. I realized that its really up to the individual- I am very well respected but I have the kind of personality where I ask a ton of questions and learn everything about a subject and how it relates to what I'm doing. You'd be surprised how much MORE we know as RDs than nurses and MDs- I educate physicians a lot- they really do rely on us quite a bit.

Don't listen to the RDs that are around you if they're unhappy in their positions- its hard when youre a student and hear all that- I know it's hard. The pay is okay and can be good but it takes a while to get there. there are a ton of oprtunities out here. if you want to be an RD- go for it!

I love what I do but it didn't start out that way after listening to my clinical internship RDs and starting to work in a rural hospital- once aI got to a teaching hospital- everything changed. good luck!

09/30/12 09:47 PM | Edit ReplyReply   |    RE: Future of dietetics?
MonigueJ
284 Posts
Chicago
Registered Dietitian


    Posted by EVE:

      Posted by Terrapin:
      I've been lurking around for a while, but I figured I'd finally post a question to everyone. Quick background, I've been a Diet Tech for 9 years in LTC facilities, and am in my final semester of my bachelor's degree in dietetics. I"m currently trying to get everything together for my DI applications.

      My question to all the RD's is this, in my limited experience, it doesn't seem that most RDs get the pay and respect they deserve, considering all the education required. RD's seem to be near the bottom of the respect level, below RNs, LPNs, speech therapist, PT's, OT's, etc. My question is, how did it get this way? And, will it ever change? I certainly don't expect miracles, but I know RDs locally that make less money than LPNs.

      I know the ADA is considering eliminating the Diet Tech position (which is why I pursued my RD), and even considering requiring RD's to have Masters Degrees. And you know what, I hope they do! I hope they make it so unbelievably hard to get your RD degree, that there will eventually be a national shortage, much like in nursing. Okay, maybe I'm just venting a bit, but these last two years have been hell, and I don't have very much confidence in finding a good job when I do finish everything.



Hi, I really love what I do!!! I love being an RD it is very fulfilling and rewarding too me. It doesnt pay a great deal...but I do love it. As for some of your comments...I hope they will make it so unbelieveably hard to become an RD...well they do! The internships are extremely competitive only the cream of the crop gets in!!!! My internship lowest GPA was a 3.85. I known girls with 3.5 that were consider a low GPA and couldn't get an internship.

Those girls without internships were frustated and became RN's with MS degrees...now they are double equipped with a BS in nutrition. Making it hard for RD's in my opinion has created MAJOR COMPETITION... Just about all other professions are educating pt, clients on nutrition. No matter if its good info or not.

I think ADA made a mistake with the competitive internships and leaving a lot of good knowledgeable people out of the profession. Many of those people would never work in clinical.

At the last ADA conference...the former president of ADA had suggested that ADA adopt a credential for those people with BS in dietetics without an internship. That would give consumers with questions to be answer by students that under our language.

I know that can be difficult with new students...but something has to happen QUICK.

10/01/12 06:02 AM | Edit ReplyReply   |    Future
floridanutr
22 Posts

Nutritionist

There are so many wonderful opportunites in this profession but I too think AND needs to act quickly to create other challenging pathways to registration. My greatest fear is that AND is creating a "perfect storm"...limiting avenues to registration while partnering with corporations (Cocoa Cola, Pepsico,Mars,Kellogs) who are actively marketing to our kids.

10/02/12 12:06 AM | Edit ReplyReply   |    Comments on Fall 2012 HOD Mega Issues?
NourishMe
113 Posts

Educator

Hi,

I appreciate hearing how passionate all of you are about your profession and the road it took to get there! I'm surprised I didn't hear anything on this board (while it's been everywhere else) about the new education and credentialling standards that will be put into place by 2017 or 2020. They were accepting comments through Friday (9/28), to discuss implemention (or opposition) at FNCE, but perhaps it's still not too late?

This material was posted on September 4th or 9th and if you haven't seen the material yet, members can via the EatRight web site or you can visit the links below. The comments so far, seem to be in line with the "goals". Definately ruffling some feathers, while it should make a few others happy. While there will be a new credential, it doesn't appear to address the DI issues for DPD-BS/MS that do want to become RDs and can't because the hospitals won't let them in, or the there aren't enough slots or now DI/ISPP are giving preference to PhDs.

Personally, if this happens, regardless of the opposition, then I hope that they ensure that with the new credentials (DTR and DPDs - new credential and RD/RD w/masters - new name?) that all nutrition professionals are able to be licensed and once completed some form of a 900hr supervised practice via a RD or LN, as it doesn't appear to have to be through a DI or ISPP) can then also be eligible for insurance reimbursement for MNT and future services. This was the let down with regards to DTRs with AS degrees, no licensure (except for 2 states) and not a high enough degree level for MNT reimbursement. Well, now everyone will have a minimum of a BS/BA and can reap that particular benefit (unless I'm misinterpreting CMS on this)!

Fall 2012 HOD Reports (Mega Issues):

1) Visioning Report - Covers the future education and credential requirements (41 pgs, also attached)

http://www.phcnpg.org/docs/Governance/Council%20on%20Future%20Practice%20Visioning%20Report.pdf

2) Public Health/Community Nutrition Reports

http://www.phcnpg.org/page/hod-2012

3) Mega Issues & Questions(summarized):

Mega Issue #1: Public Health and Community Nutrition Expected Outcomes (from the “Public Health Nutrition: It's Every Members' Business” HOD Executive Summary)

Academy members will:

1. Recognize, prepare for, and seize opportunities related to public health/community nutrition (e.g. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act [2010] aims to shift the focus of health care from treatment to prevention).

2. Be leaders in public health nutrition and community nutrition by actively working in policy development, assessment, assurance, advocacy, environmental change, education, and programs and services.

3. Provide input on how to prepare members to meet the needs in public health nutrition and community nutrition.

Mega Issue Questions (please provide your thoughts on these questions):

1. In a changing health services environment, how can our members seize opportunities and provide leadership in public health nutrition and community nutrition?

2. How can we better prepare nutrition students and current registered dietitians to work in public health nutrition/community nutrition?

Mega Issue #2: Visioning Report “Moving Forward – A Vision for the Continuum of Dietetics Education, Credentialing and Practice”

Background: The basic educational requirements for the RD credential have not changed since 1927, despite repeated recommendations for change and rapidly evolving marketplace demands. It will be difficult to achieve more rewards, recognition and respect as nutrition/dietetics professionals without a cohesive/ambitious plan for the future.

Recommendation #1: Require a master's degree as the minimum level of education for RDs (currently credentialed RDs can continue to practice/be recertified without a graduate degree). Rationale: RDs need a higher degree for entry level practice to be better positioned for coverage/reimbursement and to have a more prominent role on health care teams. Virtually all other allied health professions have increased entry-level educational standards to a master's degree or practice doctorate. RD salaries are 40-45% less than those of other nonphysician health professionals (2010).

Recommendation #2: Integrate the internship/master's degree into a seamless (1-step) program to obtain the future entry-level RD credential. Include an emphasis area (clinical, management, community/public health) as part of this training.

Recommendation #3: Create a new credential/examination for baccalaureate degree graduates who have met the DPD requirements, with minimal overlap between practice roles of individuals with new credential and graduate degree–prepared RDs). Rationale: There is a shortage of internship spots available for students that graduate with an undergraduate degree in nutrition (~50% match rate). Students with undergraduate degrees in nutrition are employed in “dietetics related” positions without passing a standardized exam, meeting recertification/continuing education requirements, or adhering to ethics/professional practice standards.

Recommendation #4: Phase out the current DTR credential (currently credentialed DTRs can continue to practice/be recertified). Rationale: The number of DTR training programs, DTRs and DTR jobs are declining. More than half of new DTRs are individuals with an undergraduate degree in nutrition/DPD (see previous recommendation).

Recommendation #5: Revise the undergraduate DPD curriculum to include required practicum/“outside the classroom” learning experiences.

Recommendation #6: Support development of board certified specialist credentials in popular focus areas, and find a way to recognize specialists in less common focus areas.

Recommendation #7: Support development of advanced practice credentials for the nutrition/dietetics profession.

Recommendation #8: Conduct a well–funded, comprehensive marketing, branding, and strategic communications campaign to communicate the recommended changes to internal/external stakeholders.

Recommendation #9: Change the name of the RD credential to reflect the recommended changes and the change in the name of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

Mega issue question (please provide your thoughts on this question):

What suggestions do you have for the implementation of the recommendations from the Visioning Report?

[Edited by NourishMe on 10/02/12 12:19 AM]


"Be the change you want to see in the world."

10/02/12 01:41 AM | Edit ReplyReply   |    New Credentials
NourishMe
113 Posts

Educator

So I just checked in on the application status of all of those new credentials we heard about this past spring and...they (AND) let them expire (possibly because they can't "own" any of the words in the credential titles, but you can do so with state licensure). With that said, they did get approval for the certification marks for each of those titles, so they may still use CNC to represent Certified Nutrition Coach, CNA to represent Certified Nutrition Associate, RNM to represent Registered Nutrition Manager, etc.

Interestingly, as I had mentioned in the post above, there is a new credential for DPD graduates/DTRs - but what could it be? There is also a new/additional credential for RDs... and I just saw new applications for these: Nutrition Professional Registered, NPR as well as Certified Food and Nutrition Manager, CFNM and Certified Food and Nutrition Practitioner, CFNP. Hmm...while any of these titles could apply, my guess is NPR is general and basic enough that it will be used for the DPD/DTR graduates.

[Edited by NourishMe on 10/02/12 02:04 AM]


"Be the change you want to see in the world."

10/02/12 05:33 AM | Edit ReplyReply   |    Future
floridanutr
22 Posts

Nutritionist

Thanks, NourishMe. I was aware of the reccs. but needed to vent. I understand the proecss and the timeline involved but I fear the politcs of AND will push us even furthur behind the curve even if these reccs. are eventually approved. A Caifornia R.D. friend sent this: This is an OUTRAGE and as a registered dietitian I fully resent this. I was so disturbed to read this right out of the CALIFORNIA GENERAL ELECTION OFFICIAL VOTER INFORMATION GUIDE. In the argument against prop 37 (i.e. why it should be defeated & why we don't need labeling of GMO's in our food) it states that "Respected scientific & medical organizations have concluded that biotech foods are safe, Including: 1) National Academy of Sciences 2) American Council on Science & Health 3) Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics 4) World Health Organization."

Thanks again, NourishMe--We all need to be informed and involved in the process !

10/02/12 08:22 AM | Edit ReplyReply   |    RE: Comments on Fall 2012 HOD Mega Issues?
MonigueJ
284 Posts
Chicago
Registered Dietitian


    Posted by NourishMe:
    Hi,

    I appreciate hearing how passionate all of you are about your profession and the road it took to get there! I'm surprised I didn't hear anything on this board (while it's been everywhere else) about the new education and credentialling standards that will be put into place by 2017 or 2020. They were accepting comments through Friday (9/28), to discuss implemention (or opposition) at FNCE, but perhaps it's still not too late?

    This material was posted on September 4th or 9th and if you haven't seen the material yet, members can via the EatRight web site or you can visit the links below. The comments so far, seem to be in line with the "goals". Definately ruffling some feathers, while it should make a few others happy. While there will be a new credential, it doesn't appear to address the DI issues for DPD-BS/MS that do want to become RDs and can't because the hospitals won't let them in, or the there aren't enough slots or now DI/ISPP are giving preference to PhDs.

    Personally, if this happens, regardless of the opposition, then I hope that they ensure that with the new credentials (DTR and DPDs - new credential and RD/RD w/masters - new name?) that all nutrition professionals are able to be licensed and once completed some form of a 900hr supervised practice via a RD or LN, as it doesn't appear to have to be through a DI or ISPP) can then also be eligible for insurance reimbursement for MNT and future services. This was the let down with regards to DTRs with AS degrees, no licensure (except for 2 states) and not a high enough degree level for MNT reimbursement. Well, now everyone will have a minimum of a BS/BA and can reap that particular benefit (unless I'm misinterpreting CMS on this)!

    Fall 2012 HOD Reports (Mega Issues):

    1) Visioning Report - Covers the future education and credential requirements (41 pgs, also attached)

    http://www.phcnpg.org/docs/Governance/Council%20on%20Future%20Practice%20Visioning%20Report.pdf

    2) Public Health/Community Nutrition Reports

    http://www.phcnpg.org/page/hod-2012

    3) Mega Issues & Questions(summarized):

    Mega Issue #1: Public Health and Community Nutrition Expected Outcomes (from the “Public Health Nutrition: It's Every Members' Business” HOD Executive Summary)

    Academy members will:

    1. Recognize, prepare for, and seize opportunities related to public health/community nutrition (e.g. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act [2010] aims to shift the focus of health care from treatment to prevention).

    2. Be leaders in public health nutrition and community nutrition by actively working in policy development, assessment, assurance, advocacy, environmental change, education, and programs and services.

    3. Provide input on how to prepare members to meet the needs in public health nutrition and community nutrition.

    Mega Issue Questions (please provide your thoughts on these questions):

    1. In a changing health services environment, how can our members seize opportunities and provide leadership in public health nutrition and community nutrition?

    2. How can we better prepare nutrition students and current registered dietitians to work in public health nutrition/community nutrition?

    Mega Issue #2: Visioning Report “Moving Forward – A Vision for the Continuum of Dietetics Education, Credentialing and Practice”

    Background: The basic educational requirements for the RD credential have not changed since 1927, despite repeated recommendations for change and rapidly evolving marketplace demands. It will be difficult to achieve more rewards, recognition and respect as nutrition/dietetics professionals without a cohesive/ambitious plan for the future.

    Recommendation #1: Require a master's degree as the minimum level of education for RDs (currently credentialed RDs can continue to practice/be recertified without a graduate degree). Rationale: RDs need a higher degree for entry level practice to be better positioned for coverage/reimbursement and to have a more prominent role on health care teams. Virtually all other allied health professions have increased entry-level educational standards to a master's degree or practice doctorate. RD salaries are 40-45% less than those of other nonphysician health professionals (2010).

    Recommendation #2: Integrate the internship/master's degree into a seamless (1-step) program to obtain the future entry-level RD credential. Include an emphasis area (clinical, management, community/public health) as part of this training.

    Recommendation #3: Create a new credential/examination for baccalaureate degree graduates who have met the DPD requirements, with minimal overlap between practice roles of individuals with new credential and graduate degree–prepared RDs). Rationale: There is a shortage of internship spots available for students that graduate with an undergraduate degree in nutrition (~50% match rate). Students with undergraduate degrees in nutrition are employed in “dietetics related” positions without passing a standardized exam, meeting recertification/continuing education requirements, or adhering to ethics/professional practice standards.

    Recommendation #4: Phase out the current DTR credential (currently credentialed DTRs can continue to practice/be recertified). Rationale: The number of DTR training programs, DTRs and DTR jobs are declining. More than half of new DTRs are individuals with an undergraduate degree in nutrition/DPD (see previous recommendation).

    Recommendation #5: Revise the undergraduate DPD curriculum to include required practicum/“outside the classroom” learning experiences.

    Recommendation #6: Support development of board certified specialist credentials in popular focus areas, and find a way to recognize specialists in less common focus areas.

    Recommendation #7: Support development of advanced practice credentials for the nutrition/dietetics profession.

    Recommendation #8: Conduct a well–funded, comprehensive marketing, branding, and strategic communications campaign to communicate the recommended changes to internal/external stakeholders.

    Recommendation #9: Change the name of the RD credential to reflect the recommended changes and the change in the name of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

    Mega issue question (please provide your thoughts on this question):

    What suggestions do you have for the implementation of the recommendations from the Visioning Report?

    [Edited by NourishMe on 10/02/12 12:19 AM]


Thank U NourishMe...I read some information, but have been extremely busy with work and family. Thanks for keeping us posted.

10/02/12 09:50 AM | Edit ReplyReply   |    RE: Why pursue Dietetics?
momof2
177 Posts

Registered Dietitian


Not all internships require you to pay- the military internships pay you a salary and are a top notch internship. I learned so much during my Army internship. Additionally, there have been a lot of negative posts about RD's not being valued or not being paid well. That is not always the case. I am very happy at my job and my days are booked with consults from MD's. As for salary, I am compensated very well. I have been an RD for over 12 years and love what I do.

10/02/12 12:09 PM | Edit ReplyReply   |    Letters
GRD
968 Posts

Registered Dietitian

All this alphabet soup credentialing is just too confusing. We need to have *ONE* credential with additional speciality cerfications (if earned). If a person doesn't make the cut to get into internship - too bad, no credential for you. I don't think that's harsh - you don't hear other health care professionals (nurses, pharmacists, PTs, STs, etc) whining about the poor wannabes who didn't get into the program. No way! Didn't make the cut? Too bad - figure out something else to do with your life, those professions aren't making up new credentials just to get more people into the field. These are the professions that are more highly respected than RDs as a whole - because the programs are tough to get into and are rigorous. And that's exactly the way it should be to earn an RD credential, with a master's minimum, touch program prereqs, and tough internships/supervised practices. Maybe then we as a profession can make a strong case for reimbursement for services - which is the root of the low salary issue. Adding more credentials isn't going to fix the situation, it's only going to make it worse, make the profession as a whole watered-down.

10/02/12 01:29 PM | Edit ReplyReply   |    RE: Letters
MonigueJ
284 Posts
Chicago
Registered Dietitian


    Posted by GRD:
    All this alphabet soup credentialing is just too confusing. We need to have *ONE* credential with additional speciality cerfications (if earned). If a person doesn't make the cut to get into internship - too bad, no credential for you. I don't think that's harsh - you don't hear other health care professionals (nurses, pharmacists, PTs, STs, etc) whining about the poor wannabes who didn't get into the program. No way! Didn't make the cut? Too bad - figure out something else to do with your life, those professions aren't making up new credentials just to get more people into the field. These are the professions that are more highly respected than RDs as a whole - because the programs are tough to get into and are rigorous. And that's exactly the way it should be to earn an RD credential, with a master's minimum, touch program prereqs, and tough internships/supervised practices. Maybe then we as a profession can make a strong case for reimbursement for services - which is the root of the low salary issue. Adding more credentials isn't going to fix the situation, it's only going to make it worse, make the profession as a whole watered-down.

Hi GRD

I would have to disagree with you. Being a RD,MPH, CDE that became a RN in my twenties and have practice in over a decade...the process of becoming a RD is totally crappy. One thing I'm sure of when becoming a RN,OT,PT and Speech Path after your second year if you don't have the GPA you can't go any further. They tell you "I'm sorry you must have the grades to become a RN. Some RN's insitutions require a 2.75 or 3.0 or higher.

In the field of dietetics that are thousands of students with GPA's of 3.5 or higher. Many of them don't get in because of the lack of internships!!!!!!!period and point blank. It's a 50/50 chance that you make it. So what do you tell those parents whose daughter has busted her but for 4 years and earns a cumulative 3.75 and can't get an internship? Oh you are a failure! No, you do something to help those students.

I had a student that cried her eyes out to me the other day. She only had a 3.3 GPA and didnt get an internship. Oh please don't give me the excuse...not enough extracurricula activities...well rounded and etc...This girl was impeccable!!!

Then I see another girl that interning with me, her dad is a MD her at the hospital and she only has a 2.9 GPA???? That pisses me off.

ADA created this mess with the exclusion and careful crafted selection of internships and now it has bitten them in the behind!!!!

Please don't take this personal... I didn't mean to come off like I'm fussing at you...if I did please forgive me. It's frustrating when you're on the other side and see these students.

Let's make this a rule...If you don't have a GPA of a 3.5 then you are excused from the major!!!

10/02/12 01:47 PM | Edit ReplyReply   |    programs
GRD
968 Posts

Registered Dietitian

I don't disagree that the whole procedure (internships) don't need an overhaul - but I definitely disagree that added alphabet soup credentialing is the way to fix this profession.

Re: GPA. In my neck of the woods, PharmD programs and PA programs are ***extremely*** competitive - so much so that it is not unheard of for a PharmD candidate to have a 4.0 GPA and STILL not get in - other non-GPA activities weren't good enough - while one with a somewhat lower GPA does get in because s/he was a more well-rounded candidate and deemed a better fit for the profession. Still, a 3.5 GPA would not cut it to get into PA or PharmD programs in my area. And those are very well-respected professions. PT, OT, Speech, etc are all competitve programs around area here, and like I said these professions do not collectively think of ways to get those who missed the mark into the profession - don't make the cut, you're out. Too bad.

Hey, it sucks, no doubt - I was a pre-nursing major then decided against that then took a lot of prereqs for PharmD but I just could not pull high enough grades in chem/orgo chem - a low to mid-3's just will not cut it in the programs around here, I knew I had little chance of getting in so changed my major again. Fortunately, many of the prereqs were the same for dietetics, and so here I am (lovin' what I do BTW).

I am also in a graduate program right now and I fully support the move master's minumum, that would be one of the best moves the AND/CDR could make right now IMO.

10/02/12 09:19 PM | Edit ReplyReply   |    Credentials
shandstar
1175 Posts
Lewisville TX
Registered Dietitian

Ill tell you guys something I've noticed as I'm interviewing now for other LTAC positions- the new jobs out there are already requiring masters- they used to say masters preferred- now they say masters required. Theyre also requiring some sort of advanced certification- even for a directors or patient services manager positions.

I live in the Dallas area and I see patient services manager with CNSC preferred. I'm also seeing RD positions which are now requiring one of the advanced certifications. I think this is great! This is definitely a way to advance the profession!

10/03/12 09:13 AM | Edit ReplyReply   |    programs
NourishMe
113 Posts

Educator


    Posted by GRD:
    I don't disagree that the whole procedure (internships) don't need an overhaul - but I definitely disagree that added alphabet soup credentialing is the way to fix this profession.

    Re: GPA. In my neck of the woods, PharmD programs and PA programs are ***extremely*** competitive - so much so that it is not unheard of for a PharmD candidate to have a 4.0 GPA and STILL not get in - other non-GPA activities weren't good enough - while one with a somewhat lower GPA does get in because s/he was a more well-rounded candidate and deemed a better fit for the profession. Still, a 3.5 GPA would not cut it to get into PA or PharmD programs in my area. And those are very well-respected professions. PT, OT, Speech, etc are all competitve programs around area here, and like I said these professions do not collectively think of ways to get those who missed the mark into the profession - don't make the cut, you're out. Too bad.

    Hey, it sucks, no doubt - I was a pre-nursing major then decided against that then took a lot of prereqs for PharmD but I just could not pull high enough grades in chem/orgo chem - a low to mid-3's just will not cut it in the programs around here, I knew I had little chance of getting in so changed my major again. Fortunately, many of the prereqs were the same for dietetics, and so here I am (lovin' what I do BTW).


We can certainly debate about GPA, but the bottom line is when an institution says that they will accept an applicant with a minimum GPA of 3.0 (or 2.75 for some PA schools) than they should FAIRLY look at ALL candidates. If "top programs in the country" for PA and PharmD admit students with an average GPA of 3.5 (ranging from 2.69 - 4.0), than why can't Dietetic Internship programs? If these programs have designed several ways of getting accepted into applying for the program with varying minimal GPAs or Test Scores, than why can't Dietetic Internships? Why is it the Medical Schools do not give preference to students that have MS or PhDs, yet once again, the Dietetic Internships and ISPPs are doing so for PhDs?

I bet all of these programs are doing more than just looking at a high GPA as the initial basis for selection, and thus are probably getting those other students that are just as passionate, as capable of applying (and not memorizing) what they learned, regardless of whether they had some challenging life experiences or had to work 2 jobs to pay for school, etc.

I do agree that the alphabet soup credentialing is not the best idea too!

[Edited by NourishMe on 10/03/12 09:28 AM]


"Be the change you want to see in the world."

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