Hello everyone! I need some insight regarding career advancement and possibly taking my career in a different direction. I currently practice as a RD in LTC. I want to do more and do not feel challenged in my current role. I also do not feel LTC is my niche. Have any of you gone in the direction of Education (any level) or taken non-clinical positions as an RD and have advice or insight on the possible opportunities? I also have my MS in Dietetics as well. I would appreciate any insight, thank you!

Hello everyone! I need some insight regarding career advancement and possibly taking my career in a different direction. I currently practice as a RD in LTC. I want to do more and do not feel challenged in my current role. I also do not feel LTC is my niche. Have any of you gone in the direction of Education (any level) or taken non-clinical positions as an RD and have advice or insight on the possible opportunities? I also have my MS in Dietetics as well. I would appreciate any insight, thank you!

Hi,
I began working in higher education in 2004, while working on my MS degree and had other TA experiences during my PhD. Later, I worked as an adjunct instructor at a couple universities and colleges, and currently work full time for a college.

Education requires a lot more work than what most people think - at least from what I have seen. Online and hybrid courses require much more of my time, plus creating videos and audio files to allow students to have varying experiences. Though many textbooks and companies provides a lot of "canned" materials and information you can use, I spend a LOT of time preparing, grading, etc. and do not necessarily use exactly what is provided. I like to create my own.

I would say what helped me the most to obtain a full time teaching job was to continually work part time teaching gigs, while I was working my full time jobs. For example, when I worked in clinical, I also taught at night once per week. That gave me an advantage - not only was it a small taste of teaching, but it also gave me the experience.

I recommend finding a college or university near you and just reach out. There are often part time opportunities available. Also by finding something part time, you can see if you really do enjoy it.

If you do decide to teach, take advantage of the school's faculty learning programs. Also, learn about the Quality Matters (QM) rubric and apply to your classes. Many adjunct instructors make the mistake of thinking since they are "just adjunct" they should not work hard and/or spend much time learning about higher education or preparing. Since most MS degrees, or even PhD programs, do not offer many courses in actually teaching or assessment, there are still many things one will learn while teaching classes!

Teaching offers many benefits: the ability to be creative in how one delivers the information (as long as it meets competencies and objectives), flexibility, working with varying subject matter specialists, constantly learning, and more. The downsides include: The work never ends, students can be frustrating at times, and more. I teach eight courses a semester (yes eight!), so am always grading, prepping, or answering emails. My current place of employment also requires service (typical of many FT faculty jobs), and this is significant.

Hi, I began working in higher education in 2004, while working on my MS degree and had other TA experiences during my PhD. Later, I worked as an adjunct instructor at a couple universities and colleges, and currently work full time for a college. Education requires a lot more work than what most people think - at least from what I have seen. Online and hybrid courses require much more of my time, plus creating videos and audio files to allow students to have varying experiences. Though many textbooks and companies provides a lot of "canned" materials and information you can use, I spend a LOT of time preparing, grading, etc. and do not necessarily use exactly what is provided. I like to create my own. I would say what helped me the most to obtain a full time teaching job was to continually work part time teaching gigs, while I was working my full time jobs. For example, when I worked in clinical, I also taught at night once per week. That gave me an advantage - not only was it a small taste of teaching, but it also gave me the experience. I recommend finding a college or university near you and just reach out. There are often part time opportunities available. Also by finding something part time, you can see if you really do enjoy it. If you do decide to teach, take advantage of the school's faculty learning programs. Also, learn about the Quality Matters (QM) rubric and apply to your classes. Many adjunct instructors make the mistake of thinking since they are "just adjunct" they should not work hard and/or spend much time learning about higher education or preparing. Since most MS degrees, or even PhD programs, do not offer many courses in actually teaching or assessment, there are still many things one will learn while teaching classes! Teaching offers many benefits: the ability to be creative in how one delivers the information (as long as it meets competencies and objectives), flexibility, working with varying subject matter specialists, constantly learning, and more. The downsides include: The work never ends, students can be frustrating at times, and more. I teach eight courses a semester (yes eight!), so am always grading, prepping, or answering emails. My current place of employment also requires service (typical of many FT faculty jobs), and this is significant.
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